Training and Dissemination Projects (2010-2012)


2010–2011 NIDA INVEST Research Fellowship
for Saeed Momtazi, M.D.

Richard A. Rawson, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (rrawson@mednet.ucla.edu)

Dr. Saeed Momtazi, of Tehran, Iran, was a NIDA International Program INVEST Fellow, selected to participate in a drug abuse research fellowship at ISAP for 1 year. Dr. Momtazi is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Zanjan University of Medical Sciences and Head of its Psychiatry Department. While at ISAP, Dr. Momtazi’s research objective was to examine and com­pare the knowledge, attitudes and be­haviors concerning drug abuse among Iranians living in Iran, Iranian-Americans living in the United States, and U.S. non-Iranian Americans. Furthermore, Dr. Momtazi was exposed to graduate courses, seminars, and workshops on campus. He was involved in myriad addiction psy­chiatry activities, such as Dr. Timothy Fong and Dr. Larissa Mooney’s Addiction Medicine Clinic at the UCLA Ronald Reagan Hospital and Cedars-Sinai Hospital’s Addiction Professionals Roundtable discussions. Additionally, Dr. Momtazi presented a poster entitled, “Behavioral Surveillance Study Among a Sample of Injection Drug Users in Iran” at the American Psychiatric Association 2011 conference in San Francisco, CA. Another poster entitled “Methamphetamine Induced Psychotic Disorders in Iran, Psycho­pathology and Demographic Features” was presented by Dr. Momtazi at the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry conference in Scottsdale, AZ. He also par­ticipated in the California Society of Addiction Medi­cine and UCLA Co-Occurring Disorders conferences in October.

2010–2011 NIDA INVEST Research Fellowship for Saeed Momtazi, M.D., was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, grant 20111206, from September 2011 to August 2012.

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2011-2012 NIDA INVEST
Research Fellowship for Dr. Xuyi Wang

Walter Ling, M.D., Principal Investigator (lwalter@ucla.edu)

This grant is provided by the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Clinical Trials Network (CTN) to provide training in drug abuse and to foster collaboration between the grantee with established investigators at the sponsoring site. Dr. Wang’s goals are to attain expertise in clinical trials research and learn sophisticated research methodologies. His research plan has two components.  First, throughout the fellowship period at the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP), he will participate with ISAP Director Dr. Ling and other physicians and clinical personnel in the conduct of clinical trials of addiction treatments, and will attend pertinent seminars, presentations, and formal courses. Second, to accomplish the objective of applying acquired knowledge to research methodologies, he will conduct a project of secondary analysis of existing CTN data pertinent to future research to be conducted in China when he returns after the fellowship. Dr. Wang proposes to compare the effectiveness of contingency management added to pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine dependence, and will examine drug use and HIV-related risk behaviors before and after medication and contingency management treatment among methamphetamine-dependent study participants.  As part of this training, he will collaborate on the preparation of a manuscript of study findings to be submitted for publication. 

2011-2012 NIDA INVEST Research Fellowship for Dr. Xuyi Wang was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, grant 20101668, from June 2011 to May 2012.

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California Addiction Training and
Education Series (CATES)

Thomas E. Freese, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (tfreese@mednet.ucla.edu)
Beth Rutkowski, M.P.H., Project Director

CATES is a series of one-day trainings (launched in March 2004) designed to provide in-depth information to individuals working with substance-using populations. The information provided is based on sound science but presented in such a way that it is directly useful when working with these clients. CATES trainings cover one or two topics per year. Each topic is presented in at least three locations across California. The target audience for CATES is substance use disorders and mental health treatment providers, administrators, and other professionals (e.g., researchers, psychologists, educators, law enforcement personnel, nurses, and physicians) interested in the latest information on the impact of substance use disorders and effective interventions and treatments. An expanded version of CATES, which now includes 3 to 6 months of follow-up, coaching conference calls and Webinars, was initiated in the spring of 2007. The purpose of this follow-up is to provide CATES training participants with opportunities for ongoing learning, technical assistance, and skill development. A total of 31 CATES training sessions have been conducted since the series’ inception, and have involved several thousand California-based treatment practitioners. Topics covered to date in the CATES series include methamphetamine treatment; motivational interviewing and contingency management; improving client engagement and retention in treatment; PTSD and substance abuse, with a focus on returning military members, veterans, and their families; and addiction treatment under health reform. (Additional information is available at www.psattc.org.)

CATES was funded in part by the State of California, Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs, contract 10-00130, from October 2010 through September 2013.

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Evaluation, Training, and Technical Assistance
for Substance Use Disorder Services Integration

Darren Urada, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (durada@ucla.edu)
Richard Rawson, Ph.D., Co-Investigator
Valerie Antonini, MPH, Project Director

The purpose of this project is to provide evaluation, training, and technical assistance (ETTA) for substance use service integration activities within the health care system of California. Over the next 3 years, ISAP will provide the following:

  • Examine how ongoing policy changes are affecting who receives substance use disorders (SUDs) treatment and how access, services, costs, and quality of care are being affected. Make recommendations to improve policies, practices, and data quality.
  • Refine program performance and patient outcome measures.
  • Collect and disseminate cutting-edge information on the integration of SUD services with mental health and primary care services.
  • Recommend strategic planning principles to guide the development of an integrated drug treatment delivery system in California in the context of health care reform.
  • Coordinate and facilitate an interactive forum (Learning Collaborative) with county administrators and other key stakeholders to discuss SUD integration.
  • Conduct Case Study/Pilot Evaluations.
  • Provide training at the county level on strategies to prepare for health care reform.
  • Provide technical assistance at the county level to facilitate integration following the implementation of major health care reforms in 2014.

For more information, please visit http://www.uclaisap.org/Affordable-Care-Act/index.html.

Evaluation, Training, and Technical Assistance for Substance Use Disorder Services Integration was funded by the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs, contract 12-00117, from July 2012 to June 2015.

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HIV/AIDS: Translational Approaches and Health Disparities

Gail E. Wyatt, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (gwyatt@mednet.ucla.edu)
Alison Hamilton, Ph.D., M.P.H. (alisonh@ucla.edu), Norweeta Milburn, Ph.D. (nmilburn@mednet.ucla.edu), John Williams, M.D. (keoniwmd@aol.com), Hector Myers, Ph.D. (myers@psych.ucla.edu), Steve Shoptaw, Ph.D. (sshoptaw@mednet.ucla.edu), Co-Investigators

This is a 2-year research mentorship program for racial and ethnic minority investigators studying HIV/AIDS, mental health, and substance abuse and their associated co-morbid disparities.

HIV/AIDS: Translational Approaches and Health Disparities was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, contract MH080664, from May 2009 to April 2012.

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Los Angeles County, Department of Mental Health
Co-Occurring Disorder Training Program

Thomas Freese, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (tfreese@mednet.ucla.edu)
Sherry Larkins, Ph.D., Co-Investigator & Project Director (larkins@ucla.edu)

This 3-year training and technical assistance (TA) project focuses of skill and knowledge development of the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health workforce to ensure providers are delivering more integrated and co-occurring capable care. To infuse co-occurring disorders (COD) knowledge and skills into the LA County mental health system, we coupled empirically based didactic trainings with ongoing skills-based coaching and mentoring of provider staff at clinic sites. Several targeted DMH providers are the focus of training and TA services, including older adult providers, adolescent providers, those working on integrated mental health primary care, substance abuse service teams, and those providing services to criminal justice populations. Our training and TA formats range from large (600+ person) conferences, small skill-building trainings, webinars, consulting, and clinical supervision and coaching, with the mission of helping professional staff better understand addiction, its co-occurrence with mental illness, and evidence-based interventions to best treat those suffering from dual-disorders. For more information, please visit http://www.uclaisap.org/dmhcod/index.html.

Co-Occurring Disorder Training Program was funded by the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, contracts MH010054 and MH010089, from July 2010 to June 2013.

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Orange County Health Care Agency –
Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral
to Treatment (SBIRT) Training Program

Thomas Freese, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (tfreese@mednet.ucla.edu)
Sherry Larkins, Ph.D. Co-Investigator & Project Director (larkins@ucla.edu)

This 1-year training and technical assistance project focuses on skill and knowledge development of the Orange County Health Care Agency (OCHCA) workforce to ensure providers are delivering more integrated and co-occurring capable care. Under the statewide INNOVATIONS programs, counties have Mental Health Services Act funds to experiment with the integration of mental health, addiction, and primary care services. OCHCA has contracted with UCLA ISAP to provide overview trainings on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT), as well as on-site targeted skill-building and coaching for staff who will be responsible for implementing screening and brief interventions at community mental health and primary care clinics across the county.

Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment was funded by Orange County Health Care Agency, from June 2012 to May 2013.

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Substance Abuse Research Consortium State Contract

Thomas E. Freese, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (tfreese@mednet.ucla.edu)
Beth Rutkowski, M.P.H., Project Director

The Substance Abuse Research Consortium (SARC) meetings offer an opportunity for professionals from a variety of disciplines to exchange current information on California substance use disorders trends, promising prevention and treatment strategies, criminal justice and social service partnerships, and other substance use disorders-related topics. The target audiences for these meetings include substance use disorders researchers, treatment providers, administrators, policymakers, and other individuals interested in substance use disorders research- and policy-related issues. Meetings were conducted on May 24, 2010 (Sacramento, CA), and September 20, 2010 (Burbank, CA), on the implementation of evidence-based practices in treatment of criminal justice-involved clients, and on September 14, 2011 (Burbank, CA), and September 16, 2011 (Sacramento, CA), on the evidence for integrated care for substance use disorders, mental health, and primary care. Additionally, the SARC contract has funded seven special theme issues of the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs. Each of these issues contained articles written by SARC meeting presenters based on the information that they presented. An eighth special issue (under a new funding mechanism), which is based on the 2011 SARC meeting series, was published in fall 2012. Additional products completed under the SARC contract include white papers on a variety of topics, including Methamphetamine in the Workplace, Prescription Drug Abuse, Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT), and Transitional Housing Approaches and Models Supporting Recovery from Substance Use Disorders, and a clinical toolkit on methamphetamine for clinicians. Additional information is available at www.psattc.org.

SARC State Contract was funded by the State of California, Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs, Contract 10-00130 (October 2010 through September 2013).

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The Pacific Southwest Addiction
Technology Transfer Center

Thomas E. Freese, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (tfreese@mednet.ucla.edu)
Richard A. Rawson, Ph.D., Co-Investigator (rrawson@mednet.ucla.edu)
Thomas E. Freese, Ph.D., & Michael S. Shafer, Ph.D., Project Directors
Beth Rutkowski, M.P.H., Associate Director of Training

The Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Pacific Southwest ATTC) provides training, acquires and shares information, and promotes incorporation of empirically based substance use disorders practices into treatment. In order to help community service providers to efficiently produce optimum outcomes, the main work of the Pacific Southwest ATTC is to disseminate knowledge about state-of-the-art treatment practices and their delivery. Drawing on research conducted by UCLA ISAP, a major focus of Pacific Southwest ATTC work has been to educate providers about the impact of methamphetamine (MA) use and effective treatment strategies for MA-dependent individuals. Additional key topics include: screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT); co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders;  NIATx process improvement strategies to increase access to and engagement and retention in treatment; the integration of substance use, mental health, and primary care services; and medication-assisted treatments for opioid and alcohol addiction (specifically methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone). The Pacific Southwest ATTC works to promote changes in attitudes across all involved settings in the Pacific Southwest (including academic and government agencies, as well as among clinicians involved in treating those with substance use disorders) regarding the status of the field, the need to increase cultural competence among substance use disorders treatment professionals, the need for greater interaction among stakeholders, and the need for more training for substance use disorders treatment professionals. The Pacific Southwest ATTC, led by ISAP in partnership with faculty from Arizona State University (ASU), provides an exemplary resource and an extraordinary array of expertise and experience in training, evaluation, and distance learning techniques for substance use disorders professionals. The combination of the ISAP and ASU groups, along with key stakeholders, consultants, and community organization partners in Arizona and California, creates an extraordinary resource to meet the extensive and rapidly evolving training and technology transfer needs of the field. (Additional information is available at: www.psattc.org.)

The Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center was funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration / Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, grant 5 UD1 TI013594, from March 2002 through September 2012.

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UCLA Pre- and Postdoctoral Training Program 

Christine E. Grella Ph.D., Principal Investigator (Grella@ucla.edu)
Kira Jeter, MA, Training Coordinator

The UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP) offers training to predoctoral and postdoctoral Ph.D. and M.D. fellows. The 2-year research training program provides a core curriculum in current addiction health services research and research methodology, and offers hands-on participation in ongoing research studies with training faculty.  In addition, trainees participate in career development activities and continuous training in the responsible conduct of research.  Specific training areas are:

  • clinical trials research (pharmacotherapy and behavioral)
  • treatment effectiveness and outcomes
  • organizational development and service system integration and evaluation
  • longitudinal research methodologies and statistical modeling
  • qualitative research methods
  • drug use and HIV
  • interventions for substance-abusing offenders, both in prison and the community
  • interventions for women, adolescents, and individuals with co-occurring disorders
  • drug use and social policy
  • research-to-practice and implementation research      

Trainees are exposed to a broad variety of drug abuse research studies and settings, and have the opportunity to select an area of focus for research that is supported by faculty mentoring, as well as access to resources at UCLA and the surrounding community. The Training Program funds fellowships for two predoctoral and three postdoctoral trainees each year.

UCLA Drug Abuse Research Training Center was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, grant 2 T32 DA07272, from September 1991 through June 2012.

Last Updated:  12/06/2012

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